Nonprofit CEOs who opt for lower pay lead more effective organizations, VCU research shows

businessman pushing golden dollar coin forward on floor in flat icon design with blue color background

CEOs of nonprofits who purposefully earn less than their peers tend to lead organizations with superior performance, according to a new study conducted by two Virginia Commonwealth University School of Business professors.

Serving Others at the Expense of Self: The Relationship between Nonprofit CEO Compensation and Performance in Trade and Professional Associations,” co-authored by Christopher S. Reina, Ph.D., and Joseph E. Coombs, Ph.D., was published in the latest issue of the Journal of Public and Nonprofit Affairs.

Read more.

VCU schools of the Arts and Medicine launch physician-scientist-in-residence program

April 24, 2015, 23rd WISDM Leadership Conference_John E. Nestler

John E. Nestler, M.D., the first physician-scientist-in-residence at the VCU School of the Arts.

John E. Nestler, M.D. (H.S.’80/M; H.S.’83/M; H.S.’86/M), has been named the inaugural physician-scientist-in-residence at the Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts. Former chair of VCU’s Department of Internal Medicine in the School of Medicine and a member of the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Metabolism, Nestler will bring his in-depth knowledge of medical science, the local medical environment and clinical research to the School of the Arts.

The physician-scientist-in-residence program, one of the first residencies of its kind in an arts school, is part of an ongoing collaboration between the School of the Arts and the School of Medicine to help improve medical education and advance the clinical health and well-being in the community by addressing and solving problems through art and design.

Read more.

VCU professor’s Garry Winogrand documentary premieres in Virginia

Black and white photograph of a man and women driving down a street in Los Angeles.

“Los Angeles,” by Garry Winogrand. (Photograph by Garry Winogrand, Collection Center for Creative Photography, University of Arizona)

A Virginia Commonwealth University professor’s feature documentary on iconoclastic photographer Garry Winogrand will have its Virginia premiere at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts on Sept. 7 at 6:30 p.m.

Produced and directed by Sasha Waters Freyer, chair of the VCU School of the Arts Department of Photography and Film, “Garry Winogrand: All Things are Photographable” is the first documentary film on the life and work of the acclaimed photographer. An epic storyteller in pictures of America across three turbulent decades, from the 1950s to the 1980s, Winogrand’s artistry encompassed the heartbreak, violence, hope and turmoil of postwar America.

Read more.

VCU opens academic year with recognition of distinguished faculty

Winners of 2018 distinguished faculty awards stand together for a photo.

VCU honored distinguished faculty with annual awards for excellence, service, teaching and scholarship Wednesday at faculty convocation.

Blue Wooldridge once lived in a section of Lexington, Virginia, called “Mudtown,” so named for its lack of adequate street paving. Every time it rained, Wooldridge said, the neighborhood would be covered in mud.

The experience sparked in Wooldridge an early interest in government, one he still holds as a professor in Virginia Commonwealth University’s L. Douglas Wilder School of Government and Public Affairs.

“My work is in public administration,” he said. “And the first question is: ‘Is a program effective?’ The second question, and equally important, is: ‘Effective for who?’”

Wooldridge, D.P.A., an expert in public and nonprofit finance and social equity, has spent his career asking these questions. On Wednesday, he was one of six faculty recognized for teaching, scholarship and service achievement at the university’s Opening Faculty Address and Convocation.

Read more.

In ‘Gay, Inc.,’ VCU professor shows how nonprofit sphere’s expansion has helped — and hindered — the LGBTQIA+ cause

Myrl Beam next to the cover for Gay, Inc.

In “Gay, Inc.: The Nonprofitization of Queer Politics,” Myrl Beam relies on oral histories, archival research and his own activist work to explore how LGBT nonprofits are grappling with the contradictions between radical queer social movements and their institutionalized iterations.

The conservative turn in queer movement politics is due mostly to the movement’s embrace of the nonprofit structure, argues a new book by Myrl Beam, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the Department of Gender, Sexuality and Women’s Studies in the College of Humanities and Sciences.

In “Gay, Inc.: The Nonprofitization of Queer Politics,” Beam relies on oral histories, archival research and his own activist work to explore how LGBT nonprofits in Minneapolis and Chicago are grappling with the contradictions between radical queer social movements and their institutionalized iterations.

Beam discussed his new book, which was published by the University of Minnesota Press, with VCU News.

Read more.

‘Hey Google, tell me something good.’ Google Creative Lab taps a VCU journalism professor’s research to share good news stories

White background with the words "Hey Google, tell me something good"

Thanks in part to the research of a VCU journalism professor, the Google Assistant is able to tell users about good news stories happening in the world.

With the Google Assistant, users can search the internet, schedule meetings, set alarms, send texts, play music, dim lights and a long list of other tasks.

And now — thanks in part to the research of a Virginia Commonwealth University journalism professor — the Google Assistant is able to tell users about good news stories happening in the world.

After a recent update, users can say, “Hey Google, tell me something good,” and the Google Assistant will read a two- or three-sentence news summary from the Solutions Journalism Network, a nonprofit organization that aims to expose people to news stories that help them understand problems and challenges, and show them potential ways to respond.

Read more.

Forensic science professor joins steering committee of Science and Human Rights Coalition

 

Researchers identifying human remains at a grave site.

Tal Simmons, Ph.D., professor in the Department of Forensic Science, has helped to lead projects documenting and identifying human remains in the former Yugoslavia, Cyprus, Sri Lanka and elsewhere.

Tal Simmons, Ph.D., a professor in the Department of Forensic Science in the College of Humanities and Sciences, has been appointed to the steering committee of the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s Science and Human Rights Coalition, a network of scientific and engineering membership organizations that recognize a role for scientists and engineers in human rights.

Read more.

Words from the wise: Five longtime professors reflect on their 20-plus years of teaching at VCU

Headshots of five VCU professors against a blue background.Have you ever taken a class with a professor who taught one of your parents? With more than 2,300 full-time faculty members at Virginia Commonwealth University, including many who have been here for several decades, that scenario does happen on occasion.

We asked five professors who have two decades or more of VCU teaching experience to share their experiences, favorite moments and lessons learned throughout the years.

Read more.

Cardio-oncology expert appointed as first director of VCU Health Pauley Heart Center

Pauley Heart Center Consotorium, Dr. Greg Hundley

Greg Hundley, M.D., a graduate of the VCU School of Medicine, will serve as Pauley Heart Center’s inaugural director.

William Gregory Hundley, M.D. (M.D.’88/M), has joined VCU Health Pauley Heart Center as its inaugural director. A Richmond native and VCU School of Medicine alumnus, Hundley is recognized for studying the impact of chemotherapy and radiation therapy on heart health, advancing treatment options for patients in need of cardiovascular and oncology care. He also will serve as clinical director of noninvasive cardiology at VCU Medical Center and on the senior advisory committee at VCU Massey Cancer Center as a member of Massey’s Cancer Prevention and Control research program.

Read more.

VCU Health surgeon is first on East Coast to complete robotic-assisted kidney implantation

A team of doctors leaning over a patient on an operating table.

Robotic-assisted transplantation is the latest technical milestone in kidney transplant surgery and demands a level of technical expertise that few transplant centers in the country possess.

A surgeon at the VCU Health Hume-Lee Transplant Center is the first on the East Coast to successfully complete a kidney implantation using the da Vinci Surgical System. Along with an interdisciplinary medical team, Chandra Bhati, M.D., associate professor of surgery at Virginia Commonwealth University School of Medicine, implanted a kidney from a living organ donor to a recipient on June 19. During robotic-assisted kidney implantations, the surgeon relies on the surgical system’s robotic arms to complete the procedure and does not use hands to assist with the surgery.

“With this surgery, we are able to offer kidney transplantation to obese people who traditionally have been denied the procedure,” Bhati said, emphasizing that the main benefit of robotic-assisted kidney transplantation is the availability to people who are obese. In obese people whose body mass index is between 35 and 40, the wound infection rate with traditional kidney transplantation is between 30 and 40 percent. The increased risk of infections and other complications leads most transplant surgeons to recommend against kidney transplantation for obese patients.

Read more.