Physical therapy program offers help for infants with delayed skills

Shaaron Brown, DPT, a pediatric physical therapist, works with Miles Mrozinski at home with his parents, Whitney and Brent Mrozinski. Miles is part of the START-Play Study.

Shaaron Brown, DPT, a pediatric physical therapist, works with Miles Mrozinski at home with his parents, Whitney and Brent Mrozinski. Miles is part of the START-Play Study.

Soon after he was born, Miles Mrozinski’s parents knew he would be developmentally delayed. He was diagnosed with Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy, a brain injury caused by oxygen deprivation to the brain during birth. It is the leading cause of death or severe impairment in infants and can be permanent.

“The hardest part is not knowing what his life will be like and also thinking that, as his parents, are we doing everything we possibly can to positively impact his development?” said Whitney Mrozinski, Miles’ mother.

A toddler with HIE experiences severe cognitive delays and motor impairments such as difficulty sitting up and picking up small objects. Like Miles, now a 1-year-old, babies with HIE must undergo physical and occupational therapies. To provide as many opportunities as possible for Miles, Mrozinski and her husband enrolled him in the Virginia Commonwealth University START-Play Study in April.

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