VCU Alumni’s 2017 Alumni Stars!

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Throughout the worlds of art, business, education, service and health care, VCU alumni reflect the brilliance of the university. Their knowledge and experience shine in all areas of human endeavor, illuminating problems, creating solutions and strengthening the quality of our lives.

VCU Alumni invites you to join us Nov. 3 at the Science Museum of Virginia for an inspirational program, cocktails and a seated three-course dinner as we honor the 2017 Alumni Stars.

VCU Alumni members can purchase individual tickets for $75 or a 10-seat table sponsorship for $750. Nonmember tickets are $100 or $1,000 per table. Sponsors are recognized in the printed program. RSVP by Oct. 25.

 

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VCU’s ‘changemaker in residence’ launches campaign urging people working to alleviate poverty to promise to be ‘sidekicks’

Master of Product Innovation students in VCU’s da Vinci Center take part in the Sidekick Manifesto social media campaign.

While visiting Honduras a few years ago as part of his work running a global development nonprofit, Shawn Humphrey, Ph.D., (M.A.’96/B) snapped a photo of a woman carrying water on her head, thinking the image would be perfect for his organization’s website.

The woman got angry. And, Humphrey realized, she had every right to be.

“It’s kind of a development trope. You see images like this on almost every nonprofit’s website. But I had taken her picture without permission, and she was understandably upset,” he said. “It made me ashamed that I did that. I didn’t use the photo, but essentially I stole her image. And, if she hadn’t said anything, I would have used it as part of [our organization’s] narrative or posted it on our website to try to raise awareness and funds for our work in Honduras.”

The humbling process of realizing he acted unethically prompted Humphrey to write what he calls the Sidekick Manifesto, a promise to support — and not attempt to lead — the efforts to alleviate poverty in communities around the world.

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Project shares ephemera from women’s suffrage, temperance, civil rights and other social movements

A postcard from a series published by The Cargill Company that was “Endorsed and Approved by the National American Woman Suffrage Association.” Source: Adèle Goodman Clark papers, 1849-1978, James Branch Cabell Library, VCU Libraries.

Sheet music for the suffragists’ rallying song “Votes for Women.” A Superboy comic PSA from the 1950s extolling the virtues of public education. A Victrola ad from 1920 suggesting that community singing would bring immigrants “into the fold of American citizenry.” A temperance movement handbill warning that alcohol is the “Fluid Extract of Hell” and “GUARANTEED TO KILL BOYS.”

These are just a few of the intriguing items to be found in a new project by VCU Libraries and seven partner institutions that showcases photographs, pamphlets, placards, advertisements, buttons and other ephemera from the history of social reform movements and social services.

“We’re making a door for researchers and others who are interested in the history of the social movements and our nation’s response to human need,” said project manager Alice Campbell, digital outreach and special projects librarian with VCU Libraries. “It’s difficult to know where to go and how to search across multiple institutions, so we’ve created a portal that lets you see choice materials from each of the institutions’ collections, and then travel through to their websites.”

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President’s message: An education Leonardo Da Vinci would have loved

Class of 2021

The fall semester at VCU has brought more than 8,000 new students into our Ram Family, one of our largest incoming classes. I expect it will also be one of our most engaged.

Beginning this fall, every student at VCU will complete an experiential learning requirement as part of their undergraduate curriculum, moving what they learn in the classroom and discover in their labs and clinics into the community to heighten their learning and to help those who need them. The REAL experience, short for Relevant Experiential and Applied Learning, will become a trademark for student life and education at VCU and further boosts our commitment to the city of which we are a part.

VCU’s founding mission, as chartered by the Wayne Commission, states specifically that the university should address the needs of our urban community through education, research, service and clinical care. Indeed, in the 50 years since our founding, our urban region has become our focus, and we have strived to be a resource that helps move Greater Richmond forward more equally for all. In fact, our distinctiveness as a university lies in our historic link of professional education and medical practice with the liberal arts and sciences, all seamlessly integrated into the fabric of our community. And so we commit to educational excellence and access through innovative, engaging and real-world learning experiences that positively affect communities in Virginia and beyond.

My vision is that, as a leading national urban public research university, VCU and its academic health science center will be distinguished by the integrated strength of our innovative and engaged learning, collaborative research and exceptional patient care, guided by our commitment to making a difference in the community.

In fulfilling this mission, some of the most important things we can do are to ensure that we have the resources to succeed and to be certain that those resources align with our priorities. To that end, I am pleased that our Make It Real Campaign for VCU is on track to meet or exceed its $750 million goal by June 30, 2020. We have already crossed the $500 million mark, and last year we received more than 30,000 gifts for the first time. That included a record 11,705 gifts from alumni, thanks to the continuing efforts of our annual giving program.

While, thanks to donors like you, we are ahead of the trend line for our campaign, we recognize that there is still a long way to go. I am pleased we have a new leader who will help us complete that work. Later this month, Jay Davenport will begin as vice president for Development and Alumni Relations, joining VCU from Wake Forest University. His appointment follows a national search in which he stood out as an experienced development professional with the vision and drive to elevate further the success of our development and alumni relations efforts. I am excited to work with him to deepen our connections with our alumni and friends like you.

Of course, all we do is possible only because we have friends like you, who care deeply and support us fully. Thank you for your continuing commitment to VCU. Thank you for helping us make it real.

Sincerely,

Michael Rao
President
Virginia Commonwealth University and VCU Health

VCU School of Education alumna Greenlee Naughton named Virginia’s Region I Teacher of the Year

Greenlee (Lee) Naughton, Ph.D. (right), and Colleen Thoma, Ph.D., associate dean for academic affairs and graduate studies at the VCU School of Education, at the 2018 Virginia Teacher of the Year Ceremony at VMFA.

A career journey can be anything but linear. Myriad experiences affect the paths we

take before becoming what we were meant to be. Greenlee (Lee) Naughton (Ph.D.’16/E), who received her doctorate in educational leadership last year from the VCU School of Education, is no exception.

Both of Naughton’s parents were career educators. As a child, she remembers her mother coming home from school one day barefoot because a first-grader in her class had thrown up on her beloved alligator-skin pumps.

As Naughton grew up and considered different professions, she couldn’t get that image out of her head. If someone mentioned teaching, she would remember that day with her mother and say, “No way. I’m not going to do that.”

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Novelist David Baldacci and wife, Michelle, give $1.1M to VCU for scholarships, experiential learning

From left: David Baldacci; Michelle Baldacci; Montse Fuentes, Ph.D., dean of the College of Humanities and Sciences; and VCU President Michael Rao, Ph.D.

Bestselling novelist and Virginia Commonwealth University alumnus David Baldacci (B.A.’83/H&S; H.L.D.’01) and his wife, Michelle, are making a $1.1 million gift to VCU’s College of Humanities and Sciences that will establish a scholarship for political science students and will create a fund to provide students with a variety of experiential learning opportunities.

“Our continuing partnership with VCU is incredibly meaningful to us both,” said David Baldacci. “The endowed fund and endowed scholarship will provide direct support to any university’s most important asset: its students. We look forward to helping VCU students in achieving their full potential as students and in their endeavors after graduation.”

VCU President Michael Rao, Ph.D., said the Baldaccis’ gift is an invaluable contribution in support of VCU students’ education.

“Michelle and David’s support of the College of Humanities and Sciences beautifully illustrates their belief that our students are committed to contributing to the common good now and in the future,” Rao said. “Along with my colleagues, I look forward to watching our students learn, discover and flourish as a result of the Baldaccis’ endowed scholarship and fund.”

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Historical marker commemorating 1917 origin of VCU’s Monroe Park campus dedicated

A Virginia historical marker commemorating the founding of the Richmond School of Social Economy, later known as the Richmond School of Social Work and Public Health, in 1917, was dedicated outside of Founder’s Hall.

A state historical marker commemorating the origins of Virginia Commonwealth University’s Monroe Park Campus was unveiled Wednesday outside Founder’s Hall at a ceremony attended by state and university officials, alumni and community members.

The marker, issued by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources, marks the 1917 founding of the Richmond School of Social Work and Public Health, which later became the Richmond Professional Institute and ultimately merged with the Medical College of Virginia to create VCU.

The full text of the marker reads:

Richmond Professional Institute

A group of community leaders founded the Richmond School of Social Economy, later known as the Richmond School of Social Work and Public Health, in 1917. Initial instruction was in the fields of social work and nursing, but the curriculum soon expanded. In 1925 the school became the Richmond division of the College of William and Mary and moved to its permanent home here at 827 West Franklin Street. It adopted the name Richmond Professional Institute (RPI) in 1939. RPI separated from William and Mary in 1962 and operated as an independent state institution before merging with the Medical College of Virginia in 1968 to form Virginia Commonwealth University.

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Take VCU’s all-alumni survey

VCU has contracted the Southeastern Institute of Research to administer the first rigorous all-alumni survey since 2009. The research project will assess alumni engagement and support for VCU; identify barriers to and opportunities for increasing alumni engagement with VCU; develop a topline alumni engagement strategy; and develop the components of a strategic messaging architecture.

All alumni for whom VCU has a valid email address should receive an email Oct. 23 with a link to access the survey. We want to hear from all alumni — from every major, class, department and experience — even if you haven’t connected with VCU in a while. The survey’s results will be most meaningful with participation by alumni from every generation and each of VCU’s schools.

Your responses to the survey are confidential. SIR will aggregate and analyze survey responses and will provide a summary report of findings. Your name and personally identifying information will not be associated with your responses in any reporting shared with the university.

Please consider contributing to the future of VCU Alumni. Your opinion is important to the development of future alumni programs and communications from both your university and alumni organization. The results will be available on the VCU Alumni website after completion.

‘Richmond Potluck’ benefits Puerto Rico hurricane victims

Steven Casanova’s exhibit, “The Richmond Cookbook,” at the Anderson.

A Virginia Commonwealth University School of the Arts alumnus has quickly turned his existing exhibition at the Anderson into a benefit for Puerto Rico, which was devastated by Hurricane Maria last month.

VCUarts will host Steven Casanova’s (B.F.A.’15/A) “Richmond Potluck” on Friday, Oct. 6, from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. at the Anderson, 907 1/2 W. Franklin St. Casanova is one of six recent alumni featured in the “Reach Out and Touch” exhibition, on view at the Anderson through Oct. 8.

Casanova’s work, “The Richmond Cookbook,” is a submission-based citywide cookbook showing the diversity in culture and background through Richmond, while contrasting living situations and food access throughout the city.

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Historical marker for ‘Richmond Professional Institute’ to be dedicated Wednesday

A state historical marker issued by the Virginia Department of Historic Resources that commemorates the origins of today’s Virginia Commonwealth University Monroe Park Campus will be dedicated Wednesday.

The “Richmond Professional Institute” marker will recognize the 1917 founding of the Richmond School of Social Work and Public Health, which later became RPI and ultimately merged with the Medical College of Virginia to form VCU.

The dedication and unveiling ceremony for the marker is open to the public and will take place Wednesday, Oct. 4, at 11:15 a.m. at Founders Hall, located at 827 W. Franklin St. Paid parking — cash or credit card — is available in the VCU West Broad Street parking deck, adjacent to the campus Barnes and Noble.

Speakers during the ceremony will include VCU President Michael Rao, Ph.D.; Tim Davey, Ph.D., interim dean of the VCU School of Social Work; Joe Lowenthal, chair of the Richmond Professional Institute Alumni Council; and Julie V. Langan, director of the Virginia Department of Historic Resources.

Guests will be invited to join a processional to the current location of the VCU School of Social Work at the Academic Learning Commons, where a reception honoring VCU School of Social Work emeriti faculty senate presidents will be held on the third floor lobby. A pedestrian path connects the two locations.

In 1917, the marker reads, “A group of community leaders founded the Richmond School of Social Economy, later known as the Richmond School of Social Work and Public Health.” Initially, the school focused on instruction in the fields of social work and nursing, “but the curriculum soon expanded,” according to the marker.

In 1925, the school relocated to its permanent home at 827 W. Franklin Street as the Richmond division of the College of William and Mary. In 1939, it was renamed the Richmond Professional Institute, and in 1962 it separated from William and Mary.

For most of the 1960s the school operated as an independent state institution “before merging with the Medical College of Virginia in 1968 to form Virginia Commonwealth University.”

The “Richmond Professional Institute” highway marker is sponsored by the VCU Foundation and was approved for manufacture and installation earlier this year by the Virginia Board of Historic Resources, which has authority to designate new historical markers. The VCU Foundation covered the manufacturing costs of the sign. The event is sponsored by the VCU School of Social Work, RPI Alumni Council, VCU Libraries and VCU Facilities Management.

Virginia’s historical highway marker program, which began in 1927 with the installation of the first historical markers along U.S. Route 1, is considered the oldest such program in the nation. Currently there are more than 2,500 official state markers, most maintained by the Virginia Department of Transportation, as well as by local partners in jurisdictions outside of VDOT’s authority such as the City of Richmond.

‘I bring this life with me wherever I go’ — an interview with author Katy Resch George

Katy Resch George.

When Katy Resch George (M.F.A.’12/H&S) was a creative writing student at Virginia Commonwealth University, she distinguished herself with both her vivid, honest storytelling and the generous, insightful feedback she offered her classmates. Now, Resch George, who earned an M.F.A. in creative writing from the Department of English, part of the College of Humanities and Sciences at VCU, has published her first book, “Exposure,” a collection of short stories from Kore Press that brings readers into the tense lives of an assortment of flawed, compelling characters so sharply drawn as to seem summoned from real life.

Allison Titus, a poet, novelist and fellow alumna of the VCU creative writing program, said, “The stories in ‘Exposure’ sear like light trails, glimmering and striking their lyrical, luminous pitch. Resch George’s characters are searchers, feeling through the darkness of their suburban lives to the edges that shape a deeper truth by which to reckon their experiences and their desires — always conscious of the pulse beneath the surface.”

Resch George answered questions from VCU News about her book and her experiences as a student at VCU.

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